Symud i'r prif gynnwys

places of local interest, such as Neath Abbey and Castle, and various churches. By the kind permission of Lord Dynevor, excavations have taken place at Neath Abbey. Mr. Glen A. Taylor, who is in charge, is doing some excellent work in bringing to light the principal features of the Abbey. At Jersey Marine, Mr. G. B. Hammond has charge of the excavations at the ancient church of St. Margaret's, and good work is being done. Last March an exhibition of local antiquities was arranged, which created great interest. Over 400 exhibits had been brought together. During the last twelve months a weekly article dealing with Neath and its neighbourhood has appeared, under the editorship of Mr. G. A. Taylor, in the Mid-Glamorgan Herald. Mr. Gomer Jenkins is the Secretary of the Society. L. J. Aberavon Antiquarian SOCIETY.-This Society, which has been in existence about twelve months, is a very live and enthusiastic one. Visits have been paid to Cardiff Castle (under the guidance of Dr. Mortimer Wheeler), Llantwit Major, Ewenny Priory, Margam Abbey, Merthyr Mawr, Ogmore Castle, Monknash, St. Donats, Llandough Castle, Llangynwyd, Maudlam, and Kenfig. At the last named place explorations have been commenced by the members of the Society, and during the coming summer work of an extensive character will be undertaken. An interesting visit was paid to St. Mary's Church, Aberavon, and mainly through the Society's efforts, two interesting ancient tomb- stones have been removed inside the church. The Ogham stone in Heol-y-troedwyr (now called Water Street), Margam, was visited, and steps have been taken to have it removed to the parish church of Margam. The Society was fortunate in obtaining some leading archaeologists to deliver lectures, namely :-Dr. Mortimer Wheeler; Dr. Paterson; Dr. Rees, Cardiff; Mr. Edward Owen, London; Dr. T. Richards, Maesteg; Mr. Eyre Evans, Carmarthen Mr. Lewis Davies, Cymmer; Mr. Ernest Hughes, and Misses Magdalen Morgan and Nesta Jones, Swansea. The Secretary of the Society is Mr. Arthur Richard, M.A. L.J. RHUDDLAN FRIARY EFFIGY.-At a distance of a mile from the town of Rhuddlan, lying just beyond its castle, stand the ruins of what was once a Dominican Friary. Tradition assigns its origin as a Friary to seven Welsh gentlemen in 1197. If this be correct, then it must have been taken over by the Dominicans in the early part of the thirteenth century. The first historical notice is the appointment